Ladies and Gentlemen, welcome, and thank you for coming. I am <insert name here>, producer of the Liberal Democrat Party’s election broadcast. I am here tonight to present to you the video, and describe the different techniques used within the broadcast. I will also explain why I used them, and why I think it makes the broadcast more appealing to the viewers, and ultimately encourage them to vote for the Liberal Democrats. I am; after all, here to answer your questions, so please, do feel free to ask me anything you like at any point during my presentation. (Plays tape to audience) Okay!

Firstly, I would like to start by talking about the different types of lighting used. We used a range of different techniques in order to give the viewer different impressions on certain things. For instance, top lighting was used in many scenes. We felt this necessary in order to give a realistic effect. Even at the very beginning, with Charles Kennedy introducing himself, you may have noticed we used extra top lighting and a few filler lights to give the impression of a bright pleasant day- something which may lead the viewer to associate a bright and positive future with the Liberal Democrats.

Also, in the classroom, we have used strong top lights, which draw attention to the considerable amount of children in the room. The lighting in the room creates harsh and sharp shapes. This helps emphasise the fact that Labour have caused classrooms to be so crowded. But then, when 10 pupils have been cut out from the front desks, you may notice the subtle change in the lighting. We used a couple of filler lights here, and the room becomes softer and lighter to give the room a happier and brighter look. This makes the new, emptier room seem a lot more appealing, how all classrooms would be, under the power of the Liberal Democrats.

We also used the advantage of harsh lighting at points in which the problems of the Labour Party were being outlined. For example, in the scene with the commuter Jill Whitehead, harsh spotlights are used inside the train. It’s extremely dull – but bright enough to see, and the spotlights highlight the fed up looks on everyone’s faces. Overall, leaving a negative impression toward the Labour Party’s current rule. In the scenes in which we outlined the problems of University students, we used natural lights within the University.

Although, when we compared the Scottish Student against the English student, we used lights a little less bright. Also using a little backlighting, as we explain how Scottish Student’s needn’t pay tuition fees. The lighting given to the English student is dimmer, as we show something unfair, leaving a negative impression upon the Labour Party. Then, at the end, with the celebration, we use exaggerated top lighting and filler lights, to give the all-round effect of a brighter future with the Liberal Democrats. That just about covers lighting, are there any questions before I go any further?

(Waits) Ok then. Secondly, I would like to explain to you the use of colour given in the broadcast. We take advantage of playing on the subconscious of the viewers, subliminally using colours of the various parties. For instance, as Charles Kennedy introduces himself, only your mind’s eye may have noticed the large yellow wall in the background. This technique causes your mind to acknowledge the fact that he is talking about the Liberal Democrats, while the party colour painted on the wall helps associate the two. He speaks of how things would be better with the Liberal Democrats.

This technique is used again in the classroom scene, when Frankie Fawcett’s father is speaking, with a yellow wall in the background. In contrast, the use of party colours can be used to create a negative impression. When you see Charles Kennedy talking about how bad the train service is, you will see him wearing a blue tie. Blue being the colour of the Conservative party, suggesting that things haven’t changed even since the Conservatives were replaced. But then he speaks of how the Lib Dems can improve the situation, just as a yellow train goes by. Their super-imposed graphics used throughout the broadcast are also yellow.

Some colours used in the broadcast help portray the mood of the situation. For example, near the beginning of the broadcast, in the classroom, the white painted walls maybe reflect the innocence of the children, however this may also symbolise hope – hope that if the Liberal Democrats win the election, the class sizes will ultimately reduce. Furthermore, the red colour of the chairs and books inside the classroom may signify the cause of the large class sizes to be Labour’s fault, although it may stand for the anger towards the situation – emphasising negativity towards the current ruling of Labour.

We use drab colours in the station scene that involves the commuter, to show how dull and depressing the process of commuting is. If you look carefully at the shots inside the train, you may notice a blue train rushing past. Even the colour of the clothes worn by commuters may suggest their emotion – red, their anger toward the problem of the rail service. During the scenes involving the University Students, the Student Union Cards are red, emphasising the negativity towards the fact that English students must pay tuition fees.

And then, finishing off with lots of yellow- using the party colour to reflect the bright future and celebration. Moving on from colour, I will now explain the different uses of sound. Firstly, I thought it was interesting to find, that research shows that most people find the Scottish accent to be trust worthier, compared to harsher accents such as Liverpudlian. So it was convenient to have Charles Kennedy speaking at regular intervals in the broadcast. We also managed, when it came to non-diegetic speakers, to balance the ratio of male and female speakers.

This was used to avoid sexist impressions and also suggesting both genders show concern towards politics. Concerning the music used, we felt that we had to make a careful choice as to which music to use. With the music at the opening, we tried to make it sound universal- we want this broadcast to appeal to everyone, so we avoided using over-trendy typed music, nor did we opt for using old fashioned music that would deter the younger generation from watching. We used bright and cheery music for the opening, as the music sets the mood. The music at the end shared a similar style, although we included relevant lyrics ‘I’ve made up my mind’.