The Development of Bathsheba Everdene Throughout the Course of the Novel Far From The Madding Crowd By Thomas Hardy At the beginning of the novel Bathsheba is living with her aunt at the age of nineteen. She is very vain as she looks at a mirror on top of her wagon. ” She blushed at herself, and seeing her reflection blush, blushed the more. ” This shows that Bathsheba Everdene is very vain. She is gazing into the mirror not to adjust the way she looks but admire herself. Her vanity makes her egocentric at this stage she is far more interested in herself than others.

At the beginning she is also very insensitive towards other people’s feelings: “She might have looked her thanks to Gabriel on a minute scale, but she did not speak to them. ” Farmer Oak has just set eyes on Bathsheba and has offered to pay the toll, and goes on to do so. Bathsheba does not thank Oak, who to her is a complete stranger at this point in the story. This shows that she in insensitive to other people’s feelings. Oak’s gesture of kindness has literally been thrown back by Bathshebas’ insensitivity and rudeness.

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When Oak went to return her hat to her she was also insensitive by returning Oak’s kindness in showing her bad mood just because Oak admitted to see her riding the horse. Bathsheba needs to develop in showing appreciation to others when they are kind to her. She has also got to learn to see things from other people view. Her insensitivity is also linked to her vanity; her vanity makes her egocentric at this part in the story she is far more interested in herself rather than others. She sees everything from her own view, and that’s why she’s insensitive to Oak.

Bathsheba is also very fickle; she can’t easily make up a decision. She keeps on changing her mind and this shows her immaturity. This immaturity is further seen when Bathsheba talks with Oak about marriage. “And when the wedding was over we’d have to put it in the newspaper list of marriages, Dearly I should like that! And the babies in the births – everyman jack of ’em! And at home by the fire, whenever you looks up, there I shall be whenever I look up, there you will be. Wait, wait, and don’t be improper. ” Bathsheba clearly likes what Farmer Oak is offering should they get married.

She likes the attention of the public and when Farmer Oak mentions the idea of their names going into the newspaper she likes that. When Farmer Oak then offers himself by saying you look up I will be there she realises what is happening. She does not like the idea of spending the rest of her life with him and does not love him. This is not her fault, but it is quite insensitive because she is giving Farmer Oak false hopes and then quickly changes her mind. Bathsheba is also quite impulsive, she acts without thinking. Actions always have consequences, and Bathsheba does not fully realise this yet, showing her immaturity.

“Liddy looked at me at the words of the seal and read – MARRY ME” Bathsheba has just sent a Valentines card as a joke to Boldwood. Boldwood has been hurt in the past before. Bathsheba has written the Valentine card. She has taken it one step further by stamping MARRY ME on the seal of the envelope. Bathsheba has got caught up so must in this trick that she is not thinking about the consequences, this shows her immaturity. Bathsheba needs to learn to put others first rather than satisfy herself. She needs to control her impulsiveness by thinking before she acts.

Bathsheba is also very independent; this sometimes makes her immature by being very headstrong at times. Her willingness to be independent will help with her managing the farm. “I shall be up before you are awake; I shall be afield before you are up; and I shall have breakfasted before you are afield. In short, I shall astonish you all. ” Her determination and independence will make her a good leader. Bathsheba has grown in the novel she is managing her farm well, but unfortunately she is facing the consequences of her past actions.

Mr Boldwood is coming to terms with the valentine’s card that Bathsheba sent, but unfortunately does not know that it is a prank. His love has grown for Bathsheba under false pretences. This is will show Bathshebas immaturity, she cannot handle the emotions of real love. She is not successful in getting her point across to Boldwood. He now confronts Bathsheba about the valentine’s card and she reacts emotionally. “Don’t say it: don’t! I cannot bear you to feel so much and me to feel nothing. I am afraid they will notice us, Mr Boldwood. Will you let the matter rest now? I cannot think collectedly.

I did not know that you were going to say such things to me. O, am wicked to have made you suffer so! Bathsheba was frightened as well as agitated at his vehemence… I may speak to you again on the subject? Yes I may think of you? And hope to obtain you. No – do not hope! Let us go on. ” Boldwood now really loves Bathsheba every time he sees her, his love grows, but it is an obsessive love. At first Bathsheba does not give too much leeway to Farmer Boldwood. She asks him not to love her as she does not love him back. This is good as Bathsheba is being honest to Boldwood, but Boldwood is blinded by the love that he has gained for Bathsheba.

Boldwoods emotional balance is precarious. He has not handled love for a long time and he had done so before he was deeply upset. Boldwood might also see this as a chance to redeem himself for past mistakes. Bathsheba is now facing the consequences that have developed from her actions. She is feeling sympathetic towards Boldwood as she calls herself wicked for sending the valentines card. At this point Bathsheba is frightened by Boldwood’s love. At the beginning she only wanted some attention from the bachelor – but now she is overwhelmed.

Bathsheba is too sympathetic at this point by giving Boldwood just the tiniest bit of hope. Bathsheba allows him to do this because she feels so responsible but this will make Boldwood love her much more. Oak and Bathsheba have a strong and constant relationship unlike her attachment to Boldwood. It shows affection and they both give attention towards each other. “You don’t hold the sheers right miss – I knew you wouldn’t know the way – hold like this… Hands and sheers were inclined to suit the words and held thus for a peculiarly long time by the instruction as he spoke. That will do, exclaimed Bathsheba.